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School's 'loonie tower' will enhace play are at Warkworth Hospice

School's 'loonie tower' will enhace play are at Warkworth Hospice

By John Campbell, Trent Hills Independant

Warkworth — Students at Percy Centennial Public School built a “loonie tower” to purchase toys, books and games for the play area at the Bridge Hospice. By the time they were finished, they had collected $1,063 in just nine days.  “It was pretty remarkable,” teacher Sandra Allanson-Kelly said. “We were aiming for $300, $400.”  The show of support by the school’s 230-plus students made her feel “very proud.”

Kerri-Anne Wilson, director of clinical services and operations, was impressed, saying it was “incredibly touching” that the students had put a great deal of thought “into how best to support other children going through such a tough time.”  Visiting loved ones at a hospice can be “very difficult and confusing” for youngsters, “and sometimes they don’t really understand what is going on,” she said.  “We want them to know it’s OK to go downstairs and play, it’s OK to laugh, it’s OK to cry … We want to just make sure they are fully supported when they are here.”

The students compiled a list of recommended items for the designated play area that’s set up for toddlers to preteens. Their suggestions included such things as Lego, puppets, cars, trucks, colouring books, puzzles and even an iPad with free apps.  All 10 grades took part in building the “Loonie Tower of Percy.”

The fundraiser was conceived by Allanson-Kelly and organized by a leadership group made up of Grade 8 students.

Memorial to former runner at W8 hospice fundraiser

Memorial to former runner at W8 hospice fundraiser

By Sue Dickens, Inside Belleville

Warkworth — Running to raise money for The Bridge Hospice the W8 fundraiser was off to a great start with 15 youngsters taking on the one-kilometre challenge this year followed by 140 adult participants, a record for the eight miler and five kilometre.

Runners came from not only Trent Hills but also from Belleville, Peterborough, Cobourg and as far away as London and Quebec.

In the kids’ one-kilometre run Carter McCredie, eight, was the overall winner with a time of four minutes. Second was Kaitlin Burn, 10, at four-and-a-half minutes.

In the adult eight-miler the winner was Adam Doxtator, 22, of Frankford with a time of 51:14; second was Allison Lainey, 30, of Peterborough with 58:10.

The five-kilometre winner was Jack Workman, 13, of Cavan with 19:18; second was Melissa Anthony, 38, of Roseneath with 21:46.

Whether running for their personal best and/or to raise money for the hospice, the enthusiasm and excitement was palpable, but there was also something special this year, a memorial to Dave Down of Brighton.

The youngest runner in the fundraiser was Jaxon Down, three, Down’s grandson, who ran in memory of his late grandfather.

“The race was always special for Dave,” his brother Richard told the crowd as he prepared to officially start the eight miler as a tribute to his brother who was killed in a traffic collision last July while operating a farm tractor.  Richard had travelled from Beaconsfield, Quebec for the W8.  “Support like this is wonderful to see,” he said.  “Now Dave, when he ran, sometimes only training with his buddies, was always out for a personal best. So today when you are out, if you hear footsteps that are about a size 13 coming in behind you as you are going, I would expect that’s maybe the spirit of Dave urging you on for your personal best,” he added.

Ken McEwen of Port Hope was running his fifth hospice W8.  “This is an interesting race, a mix of the trail (Millennium Lilac Trail) and road. The race is well organized … the volunteers do a great job. This run is for a genuine charity, so that’s a bonus.”

No tally of money raised was available at press time.

 

Lacing up for the W8 Run for The Bridge Hospice

Lacing up for the W8 Run for The Bridge Hospice

By Sue Dickens, Inside Belleville

Warkworth — Runners, walkers, joggers and budding athletes still in preschool are being invited once again to this Saturday’s W8 Run in Warkworth.

Serving up three races — an “eight-miler,” a five-kilometre and a kids one-kilometre — the W8 offers fun, safe opportunities for participants to take a foot tour of the scenic roads and trails around Warkworth on Oct. 21, all in support of The Bridge Hospice.

Now in its 13th year, the “all-comer” is well-organized, chip-timed, and famous for home-baked goodies for finishers and unique prizes for winners.

There has been a steady growth in the number of female participants, as well as runners from farther afield.

Last year, the W8 saw participants set a couple of records, including a record number of runners (130) and a total of $7,000 for the Bridge Hospice.

This year, organizers are hoping to top both those figures.

Online registration is now open online at www.thebridgehospice.com/events and on race day from 8 a.m. at the Warkworth arena.

The kids one-kilometre starts at 9 a.m., while the eight-miler and five-kilometre start at 9:15 a.m.

WORKWORTH HOSPICE SEES ADMISSIONS, REFERRALS NEARLY DOUBLE

WORKWORTH HOSPICE SEES ADMISSIONS, REFERRALS NEARLY DOUBLE

By John Campbell, Trent Hills Independent

CAMPBELLFORD — The Bridge Hospice had “much to celebrate” over the past year, “having achieved stable health-care funding for now and the future,” outgoing board chair Jill Hutcheon said at the organization’s annual general meeting, held June 7 at the Community Resource Centre.

The funding stability was made possible through the government of Ontario’s commitment of up to $315,000 a year to support the hospice’s three palliative care beds.

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s investment is augmented by funding for personal support workers and nurses the Warkworth hospice receives through a five-year partnership with Saint Elizabeth Community Enterprise, which is now in its second year.

DOWNPOUR TURNS TO OUTPOUR OF SUPPORT FOR THE BRIDGE HOSPICE

DOWNPOUR TURNS TO OUTPOUR OF SUPPORT FOR THE BRIDGE HOSPICE

By Sue Dickens, Trent Hills Independent

Warkworth — Heavy rain, high creek waters and flooded trails could not deter people or ducks from supporting the Bridge Hospice at Saturday’s Spring Walk and Rubber Duck Race.

Organizers thanked pledge donors, participants and sponsors for their support, and for raising “an astounding $17,000.”

About 100 hearty souls of all ages turned out, including individuals and fundraising teams from businesses, health care groups, service clubs, sponsors, volunteers, and families of past residents at the hospice.

When creek levels forced the cancellation of the duck race, organizers improvised a flying duck contest inside the Warkworth Arena, involving a parachute and a lot of help from participants to shake out the top two prizewinning ducks.

PATIENTS NUMBERS CONTINUE TO RISE AT THE BRIDGE HOSPICE

PATIENTS NUMBERS CONTINUE TO RISE AT THE BRIDGE HOSPICE

By Sue Dickens, Trent Hills Independent

Campellford – The story of the building of The Bridge Hospice and how it is helping people through their end of life time in a home-like setting was the focus of a presentation by Dr. Bob Henderson at a recent hospital board meeting here.

A family physician for four decades, he is past chair and now medical director of the hospice and Campbellford hospital’s co-chief of staff.

“It is known that there are three common fears among the dying: we fear pain; we don’t want to be alone; and we don’t want to be a burden on our loved ones. At The Bridge Hospice we address all three of these fears,” he told the board members.